Menu Development

What Would I Serve at Dinner?

Posted by on Jan 30, 2014 in Culinary Techniques, Food, Menu Development | 0 comments

If you read my newsletter the The Rubber Band Door Knob, you know I went through a all juice detox. Three days, all juice to cleanse the body and the mind. I couldn’t put all of my thoughts down in the newsletter but I wanted to share my approach to healthier cooking at home. The concept is to look at the development of a menu where the ingredients are not just randomly selected nor the techniques used a whimsy. The process of electing items takes time and can be hazardous. No you are not going to loose life or limb writing a menu but there are preverbal cliffs and treacherous turns in...

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The Journey Continues: A path to success.

Posted by on Jul 1, 2013 in ACF, Culinary Techniques, Menu Development | 0 comments

If you look at each of the traits that I briefly describe, you will see the characteristics of some of the best chefs I know. That is why I do it. I want to be around them and challenge myself against the best. If you want to know more read this article at the link below. http://www.buedelmeatup.com/2013/06/21/chef-john-reed-what-are-the-culinary-olympics-and-why-should-you-care/

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5 Things Considered on a Plate

Posted by on Apr 25, 2013 in Catering, Consulting, Food, Menu Development | 0 comments

I will probably choose a fresh shiitake mushroom instead of dried for some Umami and then work in some smoked/charred tomato into the soup base. Then it stops. I put the notes away, turn of the screen on my computer and go grab a cold adult beverage. Why because it is amazing what a clear head will come up with. Space is the key when writing menus. You need to walk away from the pen sometimes.

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The Tools of Refinement

Posted by on Jan 23, 2013 in Catering, Consulting, Menu Development | 0 comments

The Tools of Refinement

I use this phrase as a staring point. It is a concept I bring to my clients when helping them get to the next step. Thomas Keller in his book The French Laundry discusses things such as a sieve or tamis to refine a sauce or mousse. I see this thought process as essential for preparing food at a high level. However there are tools of refinement that need to happen not just in the kitchen and can’t be bought at the local foodservice equipment supplier. The most important tool is a really a “second set of eyes”. For most it is the hardest thing to do; take critique from a third...

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